Foot Injury

Image titleGetting hit from behind by another car while your foot is on the brake pedal can result in the forces being focused in the arch of your foot to be injured.

 Most of the serious foot and ankle injuries that can occur from this type of trauma will be evident right after the incident or collision.  When the trauma is less severe, there is a chance that the injury will be less evident right after the collision, but will result in healing not occuring as fast as it normally should. 

The tendons and ligaments on the bottom of your foot can get stretched or torn, resulting in foot, knee, hip, and/or low back pain. Generally, the pain is least often felt in the foot, and therefore evaluation of the feet generally does not occur. 

If you continue to have knee, hip, and/or low back pain that does not seem to be responding as much to treatment as you had expected, the next most logical place to check for abnormal function would be your feet.  It is worth noting that most people develop right-sided knee, hip, and/or low back pain because most people use their right foot for the gas pedal and also the brake pedal, and at the time of collision, it will be the first spot that is exposed to forces when trying to brace yourself after being hit.Image title

Cold pack - First help with pain

Ice is one of the simplest, safest and most effective self care techniques for injury, pain or discomfort in muscles and joints

During an initial injury, tissue damage can cause uncontrolled swelling. This swelling can increase the damage of the initial injury and delay the healing.

If you use ice immediately within the first 48 hours, you can reduce the healing time by up to 80%

When you visit us at the Whiplash and Injury Clinic, ask about our Cold Packs. Our gel-filled Cold Packs are made of the most durable materials. It is a silky nylon/pvc material that is smooth against the skin.

This 5x8 inch cold pack fits comfortably around your neck or wrapped over your shoulder, wrist, ankle, knee or any other injured area